Hidden Yorkshire: How To Find Milner Field Ruins

Last Updated on 28/04/2021

Almost 1.5 million international tourists visit Yorkshire every year. And it’s easy to see why! But in our Hidden Yorkshire series, we wanted to share the Yorkshire destinations that you won’t find in a guide book. This installment is an introduction to the Milner Field Ruins in Baildon, West Yorkshire. Plus, instructions on how to find this hidden gem!

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P.S. Be sure to save this guide to finding Milner Field Ruins to Pinterest. Click here or on the image below!

Do you want to enjoy the beautiful English countryside in West Yorkshire? If you do, check out this guide to locating the Milner Field ruins in Bingley. This guide will take you on a charming hike through the beautiful countryside and woodland with instructions on how to locate the remains of this once-grand Victorian mansion, now reduced to rubble and reclaimed by nature. Click the pin to start your adventure! Yorkshire Travel | England Travel | Wanderlust | Outdoor Adventure

Milner Field Ruins

This once-grand mansion now lies forgotten, lost to nature in dense woodland. Milner Field Ruins are a physical example of the historic wealth and then decline of the textile industry in West Yorkshire. This place a fascinating historic site, and it is also supposedly cursed…

In this guide, we’ll recommend where to park, how to locate the ruins, and the best time for visiting.

What You Need To Know

Location: Baildon, West Yorkshire

Where to park: street parking available at the start of the walk located at the end of Higher Coach Road (BD17 5RH)

Walk time: approximately 30 minutes to the ruins from the suggested parking location.

Terrain: a clear and wide woodland footpath most of the way, but steep to climb in areas. To access the ruins you will need to leave the footpath and head through the woodland. The terrain can be uneven in parts due to the rubble.

When to visit: access is available year-round. However, you should note that the path itself is technically not a public right of way, but is used extensively by the public. We recommend visiting in dry weather, otherwise, the walk is likely to be very muddy!

History Of Milner Field Ruins

What was once a grand mansion, now lies in ruins. It is now reduced to nothing more than two giant piles of rubble. Titus Salt Jr built the mansion was built between 1871 and 1873. He was the son of the Victorian industrialist of Saltaire, Sir Titus Salt. The mansion was so grand, it even attracted royal visitors.

A Curse?

The mansion gained a reputation for being cursed thanks to the string of bad luck experienced by its owners. In 1887, Titus Jr died suddenly of heart failure in the billiard room during a time when his business was declining. Sir James Roberts bought the house next. He was also a victim of the mansion and was plagued by national scandal and death after taking up residency in 1904.

Milner Field Ruins Wall Remnants

In 1923 Ernest Gates was the next to take up Milner Field. His wife passed away just two weeks after the move, before he himself died after injuring his foot in an accident and developing septicemia. The final owner of the house, Arthur Remington Hollins, saw his wife die of pneumonia less than a year after moving in, and soon passed away himself.

There were no buyers when the house was put up for sale again in 1930. Milner Field was stripped of its valuables and claimed by nature. The house was due to be demolished by dynamite n the 1950s, but even that failed and was ultimately dismantled by hand instead.

To today, the remains of the house lay untouched and forgotten in woodland.

Milner Field Ruins Rubble

How To Find Milner Field Ruins

To discover the ruins for yourself, drive to the end of Higher Coach Road (BD17 5RH). Park on the left-hand side, just before the unmade road begins. You can set off on the path, crossing over the bridge, and following the road straight ahead.

The unmade road is wide and clear, lined with horse chestnut trees. Walk ahead as far as the metal gates between three huge stone gateposts. Walk through the left gate to follow the former driveway. It is narrow initially but broadens out.

Once the path widens, it is fairly easy to follow. When you come to a section of the path that appears almost like a crossroads, keep to the left on the main track as it rises.

About 200 meters from this crossroads is where things get tricky. As the track starts to swing to the right, you need to head off the path and into the woodland on your left, hopping over the little stream pictured below. You will find the ruins about 100 meters ahead.

Here’s a tip from our experience. If you get as far as the gate pictured below, you’ve gone too far! Simply turn around and retrace your steps about 400 meters. As the path gently starts to turn left, head right into the woods to find the ruins via the method mentioned in the paragraph above.

Continue walking straight ahead to will meet the giant piles of rubble, which are the remains of Milner Field. We didn’t find them straight away and had to circle around a bit to track them down. But they are worth hunting for!

Milner Field Ruins Rubble 2

What To Do At Milner Field Ruins

The Milner Field Ruins are fascinating and give a glimpse into the history of the once-grand building. Here are a few ideas of how you could spend your time at Milner Field Ruins.

Appreciate The History

It would be remiss to visit the Milner Field Ruins without pausing to appreciate the history of the house. You can still see the cavernous openings to the cellar, the remnants of the interior walls, and remarkably intact bricks, which have sat untouched for almost 70 years. You can even discover a section of the mosaic pattern on the conservatory floor!

Milner Field Ruins Mosaic Conservatory Floor

Walking

The route to Milner Field Ruins takes you through beautiful English countryside. If you want to spend more time in the area, you can extend the walk. Although a little dated, the information in this guide is still mostly accurate and outlines a wonderful walk in the area, and includes a detour to incorporate Milner Field Ruins.

Milner Field Ruins

Biking

Keen cyclist? You can enjoy the route on a mountain bike. We saw several riders shooting back down the hill at top speed!

When To Visit

Access to the ruins is available year-round. However, note that the path itself is technically not a public right of way, but is used extensively by the public. We visited on a beautiful summer’s day, but the route would get very muddy in wet weather. The ruins can be tricky to locate, so avoid days with low visibility to reduce your chances of getting lost.

Will You Visit Milner Field Ruins?

So here is our guide to visiting Milner Field Ruins. Would you visit this abandoned mansion? Cursed or not, it makes for an interesting stop on a beautiful walk.

If you want to discover more incredible Hidden Yorkshire locations, click here for the complete series.

Milner Field Ruins Brick

Before You Go

So if you’re looking for a peaceful walk in West Yorkshire with a fascinating history, be sure to bookmark this page or pin it so you can find this hidden gem!

And if you love Yorkshire as much as I do, sign up for my weekly newsletter for even more Yorkshire adventures and tips!

Until our next adventure,

Love it? Pin it!

Do you like this Hidden Yorkshire guide to finding Milner Field Ruins? Follow Get Lost on Pinterest. That’s where we’ll be sharing all our great UK travel guides.

Are you looking for walks and hikes in Yorkshire, England? If you’re looking to get outdoors in the beautiful English countryside, why not discover the ruins of Milner Field, Bradford’s cursed Victorian mansion? This grand house is now reduced to piles of rubble, claimed by nature in beautiful woodland. It’s a charming walk and fascinating hidden gem in Yorkshire. Click the pin to discover the history of the house a guide to locating it! Yorkshire Travel | England Travel | Outdoors | Hiking
Are you looking for unique locations to visit in Yorkshire, England? If you’ve got a sense of adventure and an interest in history, you’ll find the ruins of Victorian mansion, Milner Field fascinating. This house was demolished by hand after dynamite failed to blow it up when it no one would buy it due to its supposed curse. Click the pin now to learn about the eerie history of Milner Field and a guide to how to locate it! Yorkshire Travel | England Travel | Urbex | Outdoors | Hiking

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59 thoughts on “Hidden Yorkshire: How To Find Milner Field Ruins”

    • It’s a fascinating place. I loved just strolling around and stumbling upon the bricks and remnants of this incredible building. I hope you have an opportunity to visit soon and you find it as magical as we did!

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  1. Miner field seems like a place with an amazing history and it’s such a beautiful place! I can’t wait to visit Yorkshire and see the beautiful hidden gems.

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    • It’s definitely a really cool and unusual place! It’s crazy that the whole place was demolished then just abandoned! I hope you have an opportunity to visit Yorkshire soon!

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    • It’s surprising what fascinating, forgotten locations are lying around, isn’t it! I’m so glad you like the post and I hope you get a chance to search for the ruins yourself one day!

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    • It is a lovely walk! I’m very fond of woodland walks so I really enjoyed this one. There was hardly anyone else out on the route even though it was a beautiful day! It’s a great secluded location and the views are really pretty.

      Reply
  2. Ooh, I love the legend that goes along with this super-cool hike in Yorkshire! We have a ruins here in Portland called the witches’ castle. I’d love to visit these Milner Field Ruins — and try to not be affected by the curse!

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    • Ooh, the witches’ castle sounds fascinating! I love unique ruins with fascinating histories! So far we’ve not felt any effects of the curse so fingers crossed we escaped unscathed! I hope you get an opportunity to visit!

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        • I haven’t actually heard of a ghost story related to Milner Field but I’m sure there must be one! The eerie setting certainly lends itself to a resident ghost, doesn’t it?

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    • Milner field is such a fascinating place, isn’t it! I’m glad you think the instructions are clear! At the point you turn off the path into the wood it is a little tricky to explain the rest of the journey! I tried my best to make it as clear as possible so others don’t get lost looking for it like we did!

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    • It’s quite a history, isn’t it! It’s sad in a way that no one wanted it and it was reduced to ruins as I imagine it was a beautiful house! I’d have liked to have seen it in all its glory!

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    • Haha! I’m glad you think so! It’s certainly a very different kind of tour! It’s such a fascinating place with so much history. It’s hard to believe it has just been forgotten now! I love seeking out these hidden gems! Thanks for reading the post!

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    • Thanks Carley! I’m glad you like it! It’s definitely a great place for a socially distant walk. The only other people we saw near the ruins were some kids on bikes, other than that, it was deserted!

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  3. Thanks so much for sharing this hidden gem in Yorkshire. I live in London so once we’re out of Tier 4 Yorkshire seems like a wonderful option to travel to 🙂

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    • There are definitely lots of hidden gems in Yorkshire waiting to be discovered! I hope you get an opportunity to visit once lockdown restrictions ease! Stay safe!

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    • It’s an easy one to miss! Hardly anyone seems to know about the ruins! It’s a lovely spot though and the walk is beautiful!

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  4. What a fascinating place! I had to look up a picture of the old mansion to envision what once stood there and wow, it really was grand! Thank you for sharing – I love hidden gems like this, especially as they tend to not be too crowded like larger tourist sights!

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    • It’s sad in a way isn’t it, that the beautiful house has been reduced to ruins! It does make for a fascinating history though and a lovely hidden gem to seek out. Thanks for reading the post!

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  5. What a shame about the curse. I mean, even if it is not really a curse, it is so much bad luck for one spot! It looks like a really interesting place to go for a wander though. Thanks for sharing it!

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    • It is a shame, isn’t it! I think it is sad that it lead to the mansion being dismantled. I bet it was an incredible building! It’s definitely a fascinating place to visit though and a beautiful walk. Thanks for reading!

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  6. Oh this place is amazing and I love the mystery behind it! I’ve only been to Yorkshire for a long weekend, so there are definitely many more places waiting for me to explore them!

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    • There are definitely some beautiful hidden places in Yorkshire waiting to be discovered! After a lifetime here, I still keep finding new ones! I find the story behind Milner Field fascinating. It’s such a great piece of local history that has almost been lost! I hope you get an opportunity to explore some of Yorkshire’s hidden gems!

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    • It’s such a fascinating place! Many of the locals have never heard of it either! It’s a pretty well-hidden spot! I hope you get an opportunity to visit!

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  7. This place looks fascinating. You have really captured it well indeed. Very interesting to read about the history of the place. Thanks for sharing your experience!

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    • I’m so glad you like the post! It’s definitely a little piece of local history that is in danger of getting lost! It’s a lovely hidden spot though and it is well worth a visit! Thanks for reading!

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  8. Hi Hannah! love your post. I am really into history and found this very interesting. I CT to your Saltaire post as well. Would love to visit that area when I get to the UK. It was cool to see that it was listed as a UNESCO site, too! Miner’s field and Saltaire both seem like gems that would be fun to visit. Thanks.

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    • Hi Ildiko! I’m so pleased you like the post! Milner Field is such an interesting place and a fascinating extension of Saltaire’s history. Saltaire is one of my favourite places to visit! I love the way the industrial history still prevails, but the place has such a strong arts vibe now. It’s a really cool place to see! I hope you get a chance to visit one day! Thanks for reading!

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  9. You always find the most unusual and cool places! This place is just added to the list of all the others I want to visit thanks to you! I find ruins/abandoned buildings so fascinating, so it’s right up my alley.

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    • Haha, I think I have a skill for finding the most random, unknown places! I love digging out these hidden gems though because it always surprises me what is out there that no one knows about! I love ruins and abandoned buildings too! There is something eerily intriguing about them that I can’t resist! I hope you get an opportunity to visit one day!

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  10. This does look like a fantastic place for a walk! It’s absolutely beautiful. Very interesting about it being cursed too, makes it more mysterious.

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    • It is a beautiful place for a stroll! I love woodland walks and I was disappointed that we didn’t have time to do the longer route through the countryside as it looked beautiful! There is something fascinating about the curse isn’t there! It definitely makes it very intriguing! Thanks for reading!

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  11. What a strange and cursed history! Thanks for sharing – saving this for the next time I visit England!

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    • It’s a fascinating history isn’t it! I love learning about the history of abandoned places. I think it’s a bit sad that they tore the house down though, I bet it looked so grand! I hope you get an opportunity to visit Milner Field!

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    • It is a beautiful walk. The mosaic floor is incredible! It’s crazy to think how well the mansion must have been built for it to withstand dynamite and to survive nature. There are some remarkably intact parts left! I hope you get an opportunity to see it!

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  12. It’s kind of crazy that so little of it is still there, considering how grand it was. Must have been a weird but humbling experience for you! Thank you for sharing. 🙂

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    • It’s quite sad in a way that it was dismantled and these piles of rubble are all that remain. It was a beautiful but bittersweet moment to see what remains today. Nevertheless, it survived dynamite and is withstanding nature today still so in some way I guess Milner Field is continuing to live on despite the best efforts to demolish it! Thanks for reading the guide!

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  13. Interesting place to visit – the history! Gorgeous wooded trail. It looks like a wonderful day trip. We always love hiking to find ruins or ancient history left behind.

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    • It is a beautiful walk and the fascinating history makes it even more special! The Milner Field ruins are a bit like a hidden treasure, you have to hunt around for them for a bit, but you’ll be rewarded for your persistance! It’s such an interesting place and the ruins are incredible to see. Thanks for reading the guide!

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  14. It’s so well hidden, looks like a nice walk. Love finding these hidden historical sites, especially ones not many people know about

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    • The ruins are definitely a very well hidden gem! It took us a bit of hunting but it was worth persevering to find them! I agree, I always find it really interesting to learn more about local history. It’s crazy to think the ruins are just sat there and so few people even know!

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  15. I love the idea of finding a secret place. I would like to go explore all the ruins and the beautiful countryside. It’s cool to have a mystery to solve.

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    • It is such an intriguing place! You definitely feel like a bit of a detective, firstly just trying to find the place! Then trying to solve the mystery! The beautiful countryside is a great added bonus too!

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  16. Miner Field looks like something I would love to do! I visited a similar area close to home this summer and it is very fascinating. It sounds like a lovely walk and I would love to explore the ruins. I love that the tiles on the floor are still intact. I will definitely have a look at the other places in your series!

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    • It’s fascinating to discover these forgotten gems of local history, isn’t it! It is surprising how much is out there that we don’t know about! The tiled floor is so pretty and it’s definitely crazy to think that it has survived all of this time. It’s definitely a testament to how well the house was built! I hope you get an opportunity to explore the Milner Field ruins one day! Thanks for reading!

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  17. I’m lucky enough to live just outside Delph Woods and Milner Field where the ruins of the what was Titus Salt jr’s home are located and I take my dog for a walk through them every day. I love how you’ve described the ruins, it reminds me to appreciate what is in front of my eyes. The courtyard is fascinating to see with all the ruins and undergrowth surrounding it. Did you know that the house itself was demolished in the 1950’s but it was actually used for grenade practice by the home guard during the World War 2 because the walls were strong enough to stand the grenade explosions? To be honest it’s only around a 20 minute walk through Delph Woods but you can extend this to an hour long walk by crossing over the nearby canal at Hirst Locks returning to Gilstead and crossing back over the canal at Dowley Gap locks to make your way back up to the ruins. It’s a lovely walk.

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    • What a beautiful place to live! It is a lovely area. We loved enjoying the woods – and we saw a lot of them while trying to track down the ruins! It’s crazy that the area was used for grenade practice. That was one well-built house wasn’t it! I doubt houses today would withstand as much as Milner Field did! I’ve been meaning to come back to the area to try out the longer walk, thanks for the reminder! Hopefully we’ll get back to explore more soon! Thanks for reading!

      Reply

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